Sunday, January 03, 2010

Hell Is Having Nothing To Do But Wait For The Conclusion Of An Inevitable Journey

The underpainting to "Hell Is.." etc. is complete! I've added lots of detail here and it's so smooth and detailed, as well as chromatically accurate that little glazing if any is needed. Lots of textures are involved as the archers polymorph to escape their fate; there is metal, water, wood, rock, flesh, shadow, and some verdiforms and oviforms too! The amount of detail here is very high so I've included a few close ups. I'm pleased with this one, partly because the textures were improvised, including the mountains which are showing improvement with each painting. It shows that a model isn't always needed for a degree of realism.





The colours used were cobalt turquoise light, naples yelow deep, a tiny bit of light red, black and white.

I've also dug out the portrait of Andrew Williams but I still dislike it. I have half a mind to destroy it and start again.

What I did right with this painting is visualisation before painting. Carefully imagining the picture allowed me to see problem areas and calculate the textures I'd like to use before starting. One result of that was adding drop shadows to some of the arrows, something I did the night before starting work, and on the whole it improved the picture.

6 comments :

Kathy said...
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Kathy said...

Mark - (sorry - had to repost my comment because of too many typos).
Your careful planning really pays off. The title, content, and execution are, as usual, masterful. I like the use of a limited palette and especially the hues you selected. The only aspect of this painting that bothers me is the upper arc of arrows. The sizes (widths and lengths) are too similar and almost consistently spaced in comparison to the other arrows that not only differ in shape and size, but also in trajectory. Overall, your work continues to be brilliant!

PAMO said...

WOW Mark! Great work!! I really like how this is coming along. The colors work so well.

-Don said...

Mark, First of all, your title intrigues me. Is this a reference to Sir Lodge's quote, "Death is not a foe, but an inevitable adventure."? If so, then Hell to you is sitting idle waiting for death? Whether it is or isn't, I can relate...

Second, great job with the underpainting. Your details are spectacular, as is your palette. You have expressed so much frantic energy. I wish I could see a larger jpeg of the whole composition - or better yet, see it in person...

I see what Kathy is talking about, but my first impression of those arching arrows was that they represent the trajectory of the huge arrow and my eyes wanted the arrow before it to be a bit larger.

-Don

Mark Sheeky said...

Thanks everyone. I can see the arc shape of the arrows but it doesn't bother me, as Don noted it was desgined to show the flight path of the arrow. Perhaps its regularity adds an element of "peace" and resolution. Anyway, I didn't think too much about it! That's the way the drawing came out so I stuck with it! There are parts I'd paint differently if I had to repaint it, but that's always the case.

Mark Sheeky said...

To address Don's question as to the meaning of the picture the idea is about a failing relationship and the loss of love, a theme that's inspired lots of my paintings. The idea came when I was on the start of a long train journey, knowing I'd be out of reach and out of touch with my girlfriend all day. Of course the idea is romanticised! The two squiggly objects near the profile represent a couple, see that the second is a shadow but it's not a shadow, the shape is wrong. The steel male is looking at the distant female. The profile in the sky there turns old and haggard as the objects progress left. The steel squiggle is the start of the cycle that leads left and clockwise, then ultimately towards the focal point in the sunset.