Tuesday, September 28, 2010

The Starcrossed Escape 2

"The Starcrossed Escape..." underpainting is complete. I'm making a list of mistakes and flaws. Such a list is vital to any painting. Without that, I might think it was good enough and I'd learn nothing and gain nothing from it! Anyway, here is the painting so far...


Of course this is an underpainting. I'll be painting over the whole thing again next month.

Now I'll see if I can demould my papier mache moons. Next week will be a busy one, starting with a press event at the Grosvenor Museum and ending with the opening of my Cubby Hole exhibition. It's dark and cold for the first time this season, and I'm beginning to get tired with painting and, once again, keen to get back to music, or even start on that novel idea. I think it's useful neurologically to switch from one thing to another. Practise and imagination exercises of all sorts are important to stay fresh and athletic.

That reminds me that my dreams are recently full of art and the night before last I made two installations at a gallery, one was a room where each object was slightly, uncomforably, larger than normal, and a second room had every object slightly smaller than normal. They were inspired by an installation by a 1950's artist, a fabulous 3D turquoise ceiling. The 3D was more vivid than actual 3D, in a way that can only really work in a dream... the ceiling was distant but the parallax effect stronger than it should have been! Quite amazing.

10 comments :

Kathy said...

Your underpainting is marvelous! It's a good idea to work out the flaws before applying the top coats of paint to this. I find it much too hard to try and make corrections later if the underpainting is flawed. I've always engaged in multiple disciplines simultaneously (musician/scientist/visual artist/sports/mother) because it makes life more interesting and I think it helps me become better in each discipline. Ben Shahn was a great advocate for it. As for dreams - I used to remember mine but I don't anymore. I think it's because I sleep more soundly now. However, like you, I used to have some very vivid dreams. Unlike you, I didn't use them as a resource for my art. I should have! Happy creating, my friend.

Mark Sheeky said...

Thanks for namedroopping Mr. Shahn, I've looked him up and been inspired. Remembering dreams is a matter of practise, and having a pencil and paper near the bed. I once dreamt that the Beatles performed for me, and when I woke up discovered it was an "original" Beatles' song. Actually, the first song I ever "wrote" came in a dream, lyrics (chorus only though) and music.

Kathy said...

Neat! a Beatles original. I remember years ago when I studied classical piano - my teacher challenged me to play a simple tune in the style of Mozart, Chopin, Beethoven, and Debussy. The Beatles also had a particular style that can be mimicked, and I suspect that as you were creating a new song in your dream you were able to tap into their style.

Inkpunk Artworks said...

Mark,

This is brilliant! Thank you for sharing your process with us.

Take care,
Brian

-Don said...

Mark, that green satin is spectacular. I like how it is complimented by the red business at the bottom. Actually, every thing about this is looking really good. It was a treat to see the image on your computer screen. Thanks for that glimpse 'behind the curtain'. I think I must go to bed too tired every night. I don't remember any of my dreams at all.

-Don

Robin said...

I feel like I am ease-dropping Mark, new to following your blog, but the painting looks wonderful and I admit I am not sure what you mean when you say you will be painting over everything (probably because I don't know much about oil paints). I love the triangle shape, it's stimulating. And as far as combining artistic modalities for expression, I am a firm believer in the overlap. Looking forward to following your blog.
Robin

Mark Sheeky said...

Thanks for the comments everyone and for ease dropping Robin :) Hello!

Greens can be a problem sometimes Don because I like to use opaque cols for the underpainting, sometimes I'll underpaint in yellow ochre at this stage, but this time I thought why not! and used a strong green to start with. It's chromium oxide actually, rather a dull pea green, but see how bright it can look!

I'll be painting over it with another layer to add more depth to the colours, and add more detail. The brightest and most beautiful colours are too transparent for fine details AND be strong enough to paint with solidly, so it makes sense to paint in layers. That means the colours will all be a bit different when the painting is finished... generally even more "zing"!

Cols used; black, white, cobalt turquoise, yellow and red ochres, nickel yellow, chromium oxide.

Kathy said...

Hey Mark - a friend of mine just asked how you constructed your canvas. Is it canvas? mounted paper? How did you arrive at this shape?

Dan Kent said...

What an amazing underpainting! Wow! I'm very interested to see what you do to it - I would have called it virtually complete. And I love how "Guitar Facts" holds it all up - every side of you is involved in this project it seems.

Mark Sheeky said...

Hi Kathy, I used MDF, 6mm. It's easy to cut the shapes you want if you paint on wood. I used a jigsaw to cut it, and primed with a coat of Golden GAC100, then two coats of Winsor and Newton Acrylic Gesso. You'll also note that there is a wide border. That's because the frame will have a big recess... it's a big advantage not to have those awkward wet-painty edges!

Thanks Dan, ah yes Guitar Facts is my most useful book! It's exactly the right size to jam behind a panel so that it snugly fits on my easel!