Wednesday, December 28, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.7: Cycles of Time

ArtsLab produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 7: Cycles of Time
Broadcast Wednesday 28 December 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Ray Thorley.

ArtsLab content is typically original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Mark Sheeky, Cycles 1 Edit (2016)
Beethoven, Fur Elise (1810)
Mark Sheeky, Death Of Elise (2016)
Edith Piaf, Je Ne Regrette Rien (1959) to George Michael, Careless Whisper (1984)
Matt Nin, Race Line Puncture (2016)
Rebecca Cherrington, Cycles Of Time (2016)
Brent Spiner, It's A Sin To Tell A Lie (1991)
Mark Sheeky, Cantus In Memoriam Childhood (2016)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Friday, December 23, 2016

Universe Expansion And Black Holes

Now, a bit of a thought about black holes. If nothing can come out, then it doesn't seem right that anything can go in, either...

If light cannot can escape a black hole, then nothing can, as no information can escape. If nothing can escape a black hole then its volume is essentially nothingness, the edge of the universe itself. If so, nothing can enter a black hole either, such that all things would be deflected to spin around its event horizon, tantalisingly spiralling towards an infinitely close relationship with the hole, the nothing, the edge of the universe.

If this were the case then black holes could never grow, it seems, although black holes can radiate and shrink, burning off their gravitational energy. Perhaps their size can grow, but only their radius, as all matter and energy would be on the periphery of these bodies, nothing inside. It would be the radius, the surface that would grow or shrink. An analogy for this would be a bubble, which can grow or shrink, but it is the radius which is made of the bubble-stuff that grows, not the air inside (which in our example, is nothingness).

The edge would hold all of the mass too. The space inside wouldn't exist, and when the black hole was formed, all of the mass would have been pushed to the outer edge where it would forever remain.

There would be nothing beyond the event horizon, and no possibility of things falling into it, just a scatter of energy at its border. This shell can grow and shrink, appearing as if the hole in the centre was growing and shrinking, but it would be the shell that changes in mass and size.

This vision reminded me of the early universe. If a black hole, the sphere of nothing, is the edge of the universe, then it could have been there during the big-bang. Perhaps, when the universe expanded, it expanded with a hole at its centre, like a black hole. This would be nothing, so undetectable. What we know as the universe would instead be a spherical shell in shape. This is of course, a well considered possibility already but I'll explore this idea a little.

What implications would this have? How would a smoothly expanding universe in three dimensions differ from a similar one but wrapped onto the surface of an expanding sphere?

All things would appear in the same way in terms of the type of expansion. Each galaxy or other object would move apart evenly from each other.

For each net increase in expansion, the size of the universe would increase by the surface area of a growing sphere.

This would be a wrap-around universe, so we could see ourselves distantly, just as we can wrap around the Earth and reach ourselves again. Constraints related to the speed of light, the detectable edge of the universe may limit the possibilities to test for this.

Errors and omissions frankly probable. This is one of several musings on life the universe and everything listed in the Writing and Essays section of www.marksheeky.com

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.6: The Sun

ArtsLab produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 6: The Sun
Broadcast Wednesday 21 December 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Lizzie Fisher.

ArtsLab content is typically original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Richard Stauss, Also Sprach Zarathustra (1896)
Deborah Edgeley/Matt Hassall, 50 Words For Sun (2016)
Scott Walker, Light (1999)
Mark Sheeky, Mosquito (2016)
Matt Nin, Mozzy (2016)
Steven Goodwin, The Sun's Too Bright Today (2016)
The Beatles, Here Comes The Sun (1969)
Matt Hassall, Shared Sight (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Summersong (2009)
Rebecca Cherrington, The Sun (2016)
Deborah Edgeley, I Came Back (2016)
Aha, The Sun Always Shines On TV Backwards (1985)
Mark Sheeky, Christmas In The Sun (2016)
Renaissance, Carpet Of The Sun (1973)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.5: Lines

ArtsLab produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 5: Lines
Broadcast Wednesday 14 December 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Krzysztof Augustyn from Project Albin.

ArtsLab content is typically original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Pixies, Here Comes Your Man (Alternative Vocal) (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Hexagon (2016)
Deborah Edgeley, Roman Highway (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Wilderness Fog (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Triangle (2016)
Helen Kay, Crossword (2016)
Rebecca Cherrington, Lines (2016)
Claire Bassi, Peace Lines (2016)
Eurythmics, Seventeen Again (1999)
Avarni, Lines (2016)
Kate Bush, Under Ice (1985)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Sunday, December 11, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.3: Leaves

ArtsLab produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 3: Leaves
Broadcast Wednesday 23 November 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Anastasia Tilston.

All ArtsLab content is original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Mark Sheeky, California Dreaming (2016)
Matt Nin, Automonous Autumn Sludge 2 (2016)
Deborah Edgeley, We Used To Store Sunlight (2016)
Mark Sheeky, An Autumn Tale Acoustic (2016)
Mark Sheeky, A Leaf Is An Organ (2016)
Chris Godber, Stargazer & The League of Celestial Bureaucrats (2016)
Rebecca Cherrington, Leaves (2016)
Oldfield 1, Peace (2016)
Steven Goodwin, On a Park Bench Watching Leaves (2016)
Matt Nin, Automonous Autumn Sludge 1 (2016)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.4: Zodiac

ArtsLab produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 4: Zodiac
Broadcast Wednesday 7 December 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Angela Topping.

All ArtsLab content is original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Mark Sheeky, The Zodiac Is (2016)
Matt Nin, The Sea Goat (2016)
Claire Bassi, Constellations (2016)
Debbie Wiseman, The Musical Zodiac Virgo (2016)
Mark Sheeky, New Virgo (2016)
Rebecca Cherrington, Zodiac (2016)
Matt Nin, Slowstar (2016)
Oldfield1, Cosmic Wanderer (2016)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.2: Old

ArtsLab produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 2: Old
Broadcast Wednesday 16 November 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Kev Aldersay.

All ArtsLab content is original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Oldfield 1, Everything Is Old (2016)
Chris Godber, Strange Creature (2016)
Claire Bassi, I Am The Holes In Your Knit (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Physical Marks Of Old Age (2016)
Chris Godber, Infinite Monkey (2016)
Rebecca Cherrington, Old (2016)
Oldfield 1, Oldness (2015)
Moragh Carter, Old Friends And Music (2016)
Russ Abbott, Atmosfear (2015)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Sunday, November 13, 2016

The End Of The World

There's a lot of doom around at the moment, but there's nothing to fear...

Every so often an apocalyptic cult or idea appears, from the End Time to Ragnarok, to the Seventh-Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, and many more. Why?

People of every time always seem to consider their times are fearful or degraded, and no matter how fearful or degraded the present world may appear, whenever you are reading this, let us make one thing clear; the world is not ending and will never end. Humanity and the creatures and plants of the world we all need will be preserved.

Societies reflect the psychology of the constituents of that society. A group of people behave as one, and we can talk and feel about groups, whether political groups, socio-economic or racial groups, or countries, like we talk and feel about individuals. We can think of countries as individuals, having personalities. One country might seem confident and bombastic, one humble, one open, one oppressive. Countries, like any group of people end up having a personality, one that is a massive aggregate of everyone in that country. Even the animal and plant life of a country contribute to its psychology, as creatures like bears and snakes, heat and cold, cacti and snow, affect how the population behaves and feels, and how the state then relates to other countries, and how we feel about the personalities of other countries.

All groups of people end up reflecting the psychology of the individuals in that group, and all of humanity ends up reflecting the psychology of everyone. This means that humanity as a whole is a complicated beast, but it also means that humanity is as self-preserving as each of the individual selves that make it up. Part of humanity might destroy the planet and itself, just as some humans self-harm, but other parts of humanity work to rebuild and care and preserve the world, just as people work hard to rebuild and care for themselves. Humanity would only be at threat if everyone became suicidal or homicidal, which never happens.

Any species that has become suicidal or murderous no longer exists, for obvious reasons! But life is clearly self-preserving across all species divides. Are there any historical examples of self-genocide by a species? No, a species could not evolve to become self-genocidal.

As a species, our greatest enemy is fear, as this emotion can lead to unnecessary anxiety and potential self, and therefore social, harm. All people have an apocalyptic streak inside, a romantic notion of a neat end, normally a happy ending after a great and terrible crisis. One reason for this might be that these fears are present as warnings of possible disaster, to cause us to take self-preserving action, or to ironically create more stable societies as people peacefully prepare for an ending rather than destructively fight for survival until the last person. Whatever the reason for apocalyptic feelings, the notion of an apocalypse can create fantastical fears about disasters which are not warranted, and certainly nothing to do with the real world.

The will and personality of the people in charge of nations, and those with influence in our hierarchical society will have more influence and control over its destiny. The personality of a leader can shape the personality of their nation and social groups to a greater extent than the other members of the populace, but even in cases where that leader is violent and suicidal, such as Adolf Hitler in his final months, the remainder of society adjusts and prevents as much harm as the other members also prevent.

Thus, we can relax. Humanity will exist for a million years, a billion, or until humankind evolves into whatever myriad forms it is destined to evolve into.

Errors and omissions frankly probable. This is one of several musings on life the universe and everything listed in the Writing and Essays section of www.marksheeky.com

Tuesday, November 08, 2016

The Münchhausen Trilemma Problem

Like you, I enjoy browsing the 'unsolved problems' bits in Wikipedia and solving them in an evening. Don't we all?

The so-named Münchhausen trilemma proves that proving a truth is impossible. We can assume that the authors didn't notice the irony in this statement! That aside, this philosophical argument is goes along the lines of every fact, on its own, can only be shown as true when relative to other facts that are equally suspect. There are a few variations on the number and type of exact possibilities, but the fundamental argument is that truths are either self-proving or depend on other truths that depend on others ad infinitum. It is a bit like an enquiring child answering your every answer with "Why?" and you discovering that you can continue forever.

I wanted to examine this and considered mathematics. Consider 1+1=2. How do we know that sum is true?

Mathematics is an abstraction of reality. When we say "one plus one", each "one" there referred at some point to one actual object, and the maths is true if and only if one real object partnered with another makes two objects (which it clearly does, but of course this text is also abstract, so you'll need to find two actual things to confirm my bold claim). In a pure abstract sense, one plus one only equals two if it is related to reality.

However abstracted mathematics has become, it exists only as a tool to describe or utilise reality. If maths never did this, so that it became purely abstracted, then any conclusions it made would be untestable, and any conclusions would be as true or false as any other, that is, meaningless! But maths is never purely abstracted, and even the most obscure theorems ultimately relate to the world or are used in describing the world in some way.

there were and probably still are today highly abstracted forms of maths that are probably useless nonsense right now, that one day might be useful. George Boole's logic was perhaps too abstracted in its day to relate to any form of reality, and perhaps meaningless and its truths self-dependant, until the invention of actual real-world computers which use boolean logic. At that point the truth of Boole's logic snapped into actual reality.

Ultimately, the truth validity of mathematics is related explicitly to the truth validity of the universe as a whole, as much as we can each personally test it. This argument can be applied to the Münchhausen trilemma too. Truth is only as valid as it can be personally tested, and as such is tied up with belief.

Now we come to truth itself, and what we mean by it. Often, as in much of philosophy, the answer comes down to the word definition of "truth" and "belief".

Knowledge is relative and unique to every perspective because it is a collection of data from different points (the universe) to a singular point (us), and this data might change en-route. As such, information about the universe is different for each observer, and so always personal. Remember that information about the universe that we have only needs to be slightly different, any different at all, to be unique, and if knowledge unique then knowledge is relative, not absolute.

The notion of truth generally implies absolute knowledge, rather than a personal belief, and that's because humans are social creatures and generally groups of us know things and share information. As as result of this gossip, a consensus emerges of what is true and factual. This is convenient, as it saves us testing everything, but the consensus is only an approximate social belief, not intended to be an exact reflection of everything, or even an exact reflection of anything. If our experiences are unique then the only complete truth is our personal belief. If we see a ghost and nobody else does then society confirms that ghosts don't exist, but to us they do.

What of machines that can test things? Are these not independent of humanity and so judgeless infallible tools that measure what is true and what is not? Can't we determine what is true using a machine? A machine that analyses any aspect of the universe is no different from another person that also does this (people can be reliable judges too!). The result of a machine might reinforce, or destroy, a particular belief we have, but it can't define truth any more than another person could, merely offer an opinion to contribute towards our beliefs. Like any observer, a machine's sensor has a unique and limited view of the universe.

So the ultimate solution to the Münchhausen trilemma problem (also known as Agrippa's trilemma problem) is that a certain truth is true if we believe it to be, and that no further proof is necessary.

Errors and omissions frankly probable. This is one of several musings on life the universe and everything listed in the Writing and Essays section of www.marksheeky.com

Replication And Decay

We start in a pure state, but only near pure for purity is infinity and conveys nothing, if one thing is infinite then all things are infinite. Purity replicates, or moves which is replication through time. Inevitably, errors creep in during replication from tiny and essentially random fluctuations and these create information. Just one blip is a steady sea creates some information. The amount of information is proportional to the mix of purity to error.

The information is random and most of the information is meaningless, but some information can, by chance, self organise or form stable structures. Some information is by chance able to replicate itself, its structures, and this is naturally selected over the random noise and begins to proliferate. During replication errors occur, as always, and so things seemingly eventually evolve into a state of chaos where errors dominate. However, as described by this idea, this factor can create the ability to form new unexpected stable structures on a larger scale.

Thus, with only one force for replication, or even motion, and a random disturbance, structures of complexity should arise. These structures should be stable and able to replicate, and during replication errors must creep in. For any replicating structure, errors would be necessary, because a pure and error free state could not evolve into existence itself.

Or could it? Perhaps a random error could push an object into a perfect form, like an uneven copper disc accidentally honed into a perfect circle, but that perfect form, being error free would be trapped in its state for all time. As a perfect form it would not change, have no sense of time or decay or be able to replicate itself. It would effectively be a pure infinite object in at least one dimension or to at least one degree, which would convey nothing, like the infinitely pure state, and if one thing is infinite then all things are infinite. A perfect form cannot exist or evolve at any point then.

On a related matter, can correct information accidentally be regained? This depends on what is meant by correct information. There is only former information. There might also be more stable or less stable patterns, but is it relevant which is better than another, or which comes before or after another?

Let us think about replication more.

What is needed for replication? Is movement replication? Movement needs a change of location but to replicate means to grow, making something new, so movement is not the same as replication. To replicate, extra energy is needed, the same amount as the parent, the thing to be duplicated, and a communication of information about the form of the parent. If the total energy in a system is fixed then replication can only occur by taking energy from elsewhere; either the background, the space into which the replicated thing would appear, or from the parent. Information about the construction of the parent must come from the parent.

The simplest form of replication is division, where one entity splits into two or more parts. This would assume that all parts of the object contain all of the information about it. The lack of complete information in some parts would cause errors when dividing in this way. Cells divide into two parts, and in subsequent twos. Would splits into many parts be as likely as a simple split into two? What might trigger a split?

One large fixed object for all time would be and convey no information, and would be the same as a smaller number of identical objects, so some instabilities must be present inside even single objects, so perhaps the crucial aspect of this are the boundaries between objects, not the objects themselves. It is the space between two objects that makes two objects rather than one, but as earlier stated, one object would be pure meaningless infinity. It is the gaps between objects that create objects. Perhaps it is the shape of these gaps that are the crucial random variational element in the universe.

Errors and omissions frankly probable. This is one of several musings on life the universe and everything listed in the Writing and Essays section of www.marksheeky.com

Wednesday, November 02, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.1: New

ArtsLab 2 produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 1: New
Broadcast Wednesday 2 November 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

ArtsLab content is typically original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Oldfield 1, Everything Is New (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Glass World (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Timeless Travel (2016)
Mark Sheeky, The Growth Of Impossible Love (Special ArtsLab II Remix) (2016)
Helen Kay, Nailed (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Nails (2016)
Dialogue with The Mamas And The Papas, California Dreaming (1966)
Mark Sheeky/Jonathan Tarplee, Dreams Of Golden Cornfield Light (2016)
Rebecca Cherrington, New (2016)
Captain Sensible, Happy Talk (1994) overdubbed with reverse excerpts from The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos by Brian Greene (2012)
Patsy Gallant, From New York to L.A. (1977)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

ArtsLab S2 Ep.0: Experimentation

ArtsLab produced and presented by Mark Sheeky
Series 2 Episode 0: Experimentation
Broadcast Wednesday 26 October 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Jonathan Tarplee.

From Series 2 onwards, ArtsLab content is typically original, created by artists and poets for each episode.

Mark Sheeky, One Dream Is All It Takes (2016)
Jonathan Tarplee, Where The Golden Cornfield Light Is Grown (2016)
Mark Sheeky & Jonathan Tarplee, Dreams Of Golden Cornfield Light (2016)
Rebecca Cherrington, Experiment (2016)
Matt Nin, Assim 9.1 (2016)
Mash Collective, Live Jam 01 (2016)
Claire Bassi, Inhalational Aesthetics (2016)
Oldfield 1, Experiment V (2016)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.52

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 52
Broadcast Wednesday 19 October 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guests Mark Edmonds and Ronnie von Tripod.

Mark Sheeky, The Twitter Hashtag Song (2016)
Gloria Gaynor, I Will Survive (1978)
Mark Sheeky, Glass World (2016)
Abba, The Day Before You Came (1981)
Captain Beefheart, Big Eyed Beans From Venus (1972)
Kate Bush, Hello Earth (1985)
Kate Bush, The Morning Fog (1985)
Richard Strauss, Also Sprach Zarathustra (1896)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.52

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 51
Broadcast Wednesday 12 October 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Ian Parr.

Eddi Reader, Jamie Come Try Me (2003)
Yann Tiersen, Comptine D`un Autre Été l`Apres Midi (2001)
Nik Bizzell-Browning, 11 Dimensions, (2015)
Del Shannon, Runaway (1961)
Kate Bush, Jig of Life (1985)
Unknown, Mega Masochist Ending (2010)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, October 05, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.50

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 50
Broadcast Wednesday 5 October 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Lisa Lougheed, Run With Us (1988)
Gil Scott Heron, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (1970)
George Elliott, And I Am Lonely (1850)
Mark Sheeky & Tor James Faulkner, Frost (2009)
Ennio Morricone, Chi Mai (1972)
Legendary Stardust Cowboy, Paralyzed (1968)
Mark Sheeky & Tor James Faulkner, Coma (2009)
David Lynch, She Rise Up (2011)
Blancmange, The Day Before You Came (1984)
Kate Bush, Watching You Without Me (1985)
Huey Lewis And The News, The Power Of Love (1986)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.49

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 49
Broadcast Wednesday 28 September 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Rory Coward.

The Pretenders, Angel Of The Morning (1994)
Nick Drake, Clothes Of Sand (1994)
Vangelis, Chariots of Fire (1981)
Christopher Casson, Twinkle Twinkle (1967)
David Bowie, Five Years (1972)
Chris Hülsbeck, Turrican II The Final Fight (1991)
Monty Python, I'm A Lumberjack (1974)
Kate Bush, Waking the Witch (1985)
Vic Reeves & The Wonderstuff, Dizzy (1991)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.48

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 48
Broadcast Wednesday 21 September 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest David Subacchi.

Bob Dylan, Subterranean Homesick Blues (1965)
Taizé, Oh Lord Hear My Prayer (1991)
Dylan Thomas, Before We Mothernaked Fall (1933)
Mark Sheeky & Tor James Faulkner, Challenger (2009)
Rush, Bravest Face (2007)
Telly Savalas, Rubber Bands And Bits Of String (1974)
Kate Bush, 2 Under Ice (1985)
10,000 Maniacs, What's The Matter Here (1987)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.47

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 47
Broadcast Wednesday 14 September 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Simon Sez.

Noel Harrison, The Windmills Of Your Mind (1968)
10,000 Maniacs, Hey Jack Kerouac (1987)
Alice Fulton, After the Angelectomy (2015)
Rush, Bravest Face (2007)
Brokengod, Third Mind From The Sun (2015)
Abba, The Day Before You Came (1981) to Rossini, The William Tell Overture (1890)
Kenn Dodd, Tears for Souvenirs (1965)
Kate Bush, And Dream of Sheep (1985)
Mark Sheeky, James Tenney Stochastic Quartet (2015)
James Tenney, Stochastic Quartet (1963)
Jane Wiedlin, Rush Hour (1988)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

James Tenney Stochastic Quartet

A poem for today's ArtsLab programme, inspired by, and to accompany music by, James Tenney.

James Tenney Stochastic Quartet

One, two
hues of potatoes
and curious under-dwelling forms
of clay and soft mouth
detritivores
insular cryptic creatures in crypts
wormwood and bile
the sauces of decay
brushed formaldehyde
and steel fingers plucking the wire, the pixie pianist
steel fingers
light, delight
the tiny candle burns for you
brown hues, flickers through yellowed wax
potato earth
one, two.

Wednesday, September 07, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.46: Eldorado Special

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 46: Eldorado Special
Broadcast Wednesday 7 September 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Eagles, Hotel California (1976)
ELO, Eldorado Overture (1974)
ELO, Can't Get It Out of My Head (1974)
ELO, Boy Blue (1974)
ELO, Laredo Tornado (1974)
ELO, Poor Boy (The Greenwood) (1974)
ELO, Mister Kingdom (1974)
ELO, Nobody's Child (1974)
ELO, Illusions in G Major (1974)
ELO, Eldorado (1974)
ELO, Eldorado Finale (1974)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.45

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 45
Broadcast Wednesday 31 August 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Connor Owen.

Radiohead/EMF, The Bends/Unbelieveable (1995)/(1991)
Don Henley, Boys of Summer (1984)
Delta Rhythm Boys, Dem Bones (1957)
Christopher Casson, Oh Dear What Can The Matter Be (1967)
Alfredo Catalini, Ebben? Ne Andrò Lontana (1892)
ELO, Eldorado Finale (1974)
Abba, The Day Before You Came (1981) to Mark Sheeky, The Old Woman And The Windmill (2013)
McAlmont and Butler, Yes (1995)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.44

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 44
Broadcast Wednesday 24 August 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Rina Tillinger.

Sparks, This Is The Renaissance (2008)
Telly Savalas, Rubber Bands And Bits Of String (1974)
Deborah Edgeley, The Orgastic Future (2016)
Salvador Dalí & Igor Wakhévitch, Être Dieu Overture (Extract) (1985)
Tiny Tim, Tiptoe Through the Tulips (2012)
Delta Goodrem, I Can Sing A Rainbow (2004)
ELO, Eldorado (1974)
Punishment of Luxury, Puppet Life (1979)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Composing For Piano

For most of this week I've been working on some piano music, initially for a performance at Chester Cathedral on September 23rd 2016. My first public performance of any sort was in July 2015, at an art preview. Myself with artist Sabine Kussmaul had been asked to do "something" at the opening of an exhibition then, and I asked an artist friend, the enigmatic "Escargot" to help too. I largely improvised music to accompany Snail's automatic stories for that; no pressure, as the result was destined to be "avant-garde" and should merely be expressive, which is simple. Falling over can be expressive, and for an artist always is. An artist doing anything is art. Honest expression is the root of art and the duty of the artist, so to act this way is simple.

Here is a photo from that event a year ago...

The music then evolved, and that performance, named The Anatomy of Emotions, became a series of six piano tunes of about 4 minutes. These tunes grew independently. The last one was a simple single chord melody. The second tune was an improvisation around A minor and E minor, those two tunes were present at that first performance. The others were written for the second performance, and were very simple melodies and arpeggios, each amounting to about two minutes which then repeated with a bit of variation. Earlier this year I released the set as an album, lengthened a few tracks and added a few more in a similar style, some live improvisations.

Now I'm tasked with new music with a similar layout, again to accompany videos by Sabine.

This time I had to write everything from a starting point, and I wanted to create something unified, like a six movement sonata. My self-taught piano playing is far from performance standard, yet I knew that I could improve by inserting a few parts that would train me by virtue of having to play them, but I still felt very lacking in the performance skills that I needed to truly compose the music I'd like. Thus, I must create something with a rough outline but an artistic heart.

The six parts represent different ideas related to architecture; Organic Flow, Old Versus New, Perpetual Change, Death/Collapse, The Night/Healing, Rebirth Connections.

I began with a simple cycling tune that reminded me of perpetual change because it created in my mind the image of a perpetual motion machine. This melody was in D minor and made up of a group of four notes with the emphasis on the last note. I thought of expanding this idea, and made an outline of the "death/collapse" tune use the same melody. For the rest though, something new was needed, so I inverted the melody a bit, making it climb up in D minor, using slightly different notes. Then I created a positive version of the same melody in C major, a happy version. This eventually became the main melody in the final part.

In drama or music, one trick is to create a cresendo, or single moment that summarises the whole, then build towards it. In a limerick it's best to write the first line, then the last, and so in music too, creating the start and then the ending, then make everything pull towards the ending. This is the key. The end is always a destination that should be longed for. Alfred Hitchcock said that he wishes he'd not had the climax in his films, to keep his famously tense audience, tense. Beethoven's Ninth Symphony essentially begins with the famous Ode to Joy, yet the music doesn't start with it, instead lighting a touch paper that drops hints towards it all over the place, such that the audience expects it, unconsciously.

I fear that my conclusion is a little more overt! The seeds of my first piece "Organic Flow" are sad and searching. Old Versus New will be largely improvised on this theme, thus bridging the gaps between it and the slightly different (yet related) perpetual change, the only part in 3/4 time.

I'm still working on a lot of this, and learning apace to read music. A thousand curses that I didn't do this earlier, but we can't change the past. I'd not played a piano at all until 2008 at a friend's house, and only started playing "seriously" last autumn, just as I only started painting "seriously" in January 2007. Memorising the 30 minutes of new music requires a few mental tricks, hindered a little by a performance of The Anatomy of Emotions the week before the premiere of this music, but we can't fail, if we are expressive.

Meanwhile here is a poster for the accompanying art exhibition, which I'll also be submitting some sculptural work to.

Wednesday, August 03, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.43

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 43
Broadcast Wednesday 3 August 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

The Buggles, Video Killed The Radio Star (1970)
Marcel Duchamp, The Creative Act (1957)
Brin Addison, Ludwin van Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op 27 No 2, Moonlight (1801)
Telly Savalas, Rubber Bands And Bits Of String (1974)
Elaine Snelson, Soulless Puppet (2016)
Detroit Spinners, Rubberband Man (1976)
ELO, Eldorado (1974)
Splodgenessabounds, Yarmouth Five-O (1981)
Marcel Duchamp, Playing White Vs. Daniel Noteboom (1931)
Focus, Sylvia (1973)
Abba, The Day Before You Came (1981) to Martin Galway, Ocean Loader 2 (1985)
Martha Argerich, J.S. Bach, Partita No. 2, Capriccio (1726)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.42

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 42
Broadcast Wednesday 27 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Jackie Lee, The Rupert Bear Theme (1970)
Prokofiev, Romeo and Juliet Suite: Madrigal (1935)
Somebody to Love, Jefferson Airplane (1967)
William Shakespeare, Sigh no more (1598)
The Passions, In Love With A German Film Star (1981)
Deborah Edgeley, Dry Grass Sings (2016)
Alphaville, Summer in Berlin (1984)
ELO, Illusions In G Major (1974)
Leona Anderson, Rats In My Room (1958)
Tim Watson, The Stars (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Starscape (2016)
Origa, Shooting Star (2013)
Abba, The Day Before You Came (1981) to Rentaro Taki, Moon Over The Ruined Castle (1901)
Mark Sheeky, The Hague 1882 (2006)
Don McLean, Vincent (1971)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Sunday, July 24, 2016

MIDI Variable Length Value Code

I added a Type 1 MIDI export function to my sequencer software today, so I thought I'd post the MIDI delta time code I used as I couldn't find any other code snippets online.

lword tempstore[4], tempstorecounter, i, deltatime, trackbuffersize;
char trackbuffer[];
.
.
.
// This will convert a long word time variable in deltatime into variable bit rate MIDI delta time
// format, storing it as a string of chars in "trackbuffer"
// tempstore is used to invert the significance of the bits, as the MBS's need to come first

for (tempstorecounter=0; deltatime>127; deltatime=(deltatime>>7))
tempstore[tempstorecounter++]=(char)(deltatime&0x7f);
tempstore[tempstorecounter++]=deltatime;
for (i=0; i<tempstorecounter; i++)
{
if (i<tempstorecounter-1)
trackbuffer[trackbuffersize++]=(char)(0x80|tempstore[tempstorecounter-1-i]);
else
trackbuffer[trackbuffersize++]=(char)tempstore[tempstorecounter-1-i];
}

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.41

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 41
Broadcast Wednesday 20 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Live Phone-In With Alex Staniforth.

Jeff Wayne, Eve Of The War (1978) into The Flumps (1977)
Mary Black, The Fog in Monterey (1989)
Jim Clarkson, The Whale (2016)
John Taverner, The Whale (1968)
ELO, Nobody's Child (1974)
The Shaggs, That Little Sports Car (1969)
Delta Goodrem, I Can Sing A Rainbow (2004)
Yann Tiersen, Porz Goret (2015)
The Day Before You Came (1981) to Herb Alpert, Spanish Flea (1965)
Mark Sheeky, Space Love (2008)
Audial Arts, Fate No. 7 (1991)
Paul Sheeky, PTHazard Still Life In Blue (2008)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.40

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 40
Broadcast Wednesday 13 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Alfred Piccaver, There'll Always Be An England (1940)
Art Garfunkel, Bright Eyes (1979)
Queen, Ogre Battle (1974)
Gabrielle Aplin, The Power Of Love (2013)
The Piggleswick Folk, Teddy Bears Picnic (1967)
Alizee, Jen Ai Marre (2006)
ELO, Mister Kingdom (1974)
Abba, The Day Before You Came to Brad Fiedel, The Terminator (1984)
Deborah Edgeley/Dave Hulatt, If Bach Had Been A Beekeeper by Charles Tomlinson (2016)
Bach, Cello Suite No.1 Prelude (1717)
Peter Gabriel, Blood of Eden (1992)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

A Free Will Of Infinite Possibility

Free will is our ability to imagine any possible future, even though we are destined to enact only the one that was always fated. It is the barrier between these states that causes all of our agonies.

The mind-body gap, the gap between the real world and our thoughts, is the gap between the certainty of the universe and fate and the uncertainty, the infinite possibility of the imagination. If time is a dimension then the future is necessarily as firm as the past, and destiny is certain, but we can think anything that we do not enact. It is this very freedom, akin to a quantum state of flux that gives us the illusion of freewill.

The very moment when our thoughts are read by our perception then, those thoughts snap into reality, but before this our thoughts are free to conceptualise anything. This is pure freedom versus containment on one level. Perhaps at that point, the ball is already rolling and fate will create a pattern of thought and argument that will end with an inevitable action on the world, but crucially, there is a point where infinite possibility exists, or at least a fluid potential that is not a definite and certain action. This is freedom, and the barrier between this free state and a future certain state marks the boundary between free-will and fate.

In emotional terms, I suspect that wrestling with this barrier, which much surely be an organic, evolving and fluid, psychological membrane, is the root of human distress.

Errors and omissions frankly probable. This is one of several musings on life the universe and everything listed in the Writing and Essays section of www.marksheeky.com

ArtsLab S1 Ep.39

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 39
Broadcast Wednesday 6 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Sylvia Hikins.

Paul Muriat, Love Is Blue (1967)
Arvo Part, Cantus In Memoriam Benjamin Britten (1977)
Christopher Casson, Oh Dear What Can The Matter Be (1969)
Bjork, Aurora (2001)
ELO, Mister Kingdom (1974)
Abba, The Day Before You Came to Mozart, Lacrimosa (1791)
Snowbird, Anne Murray (1969)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.38

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 38
Broadcast Wednesday 29 June 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Roxy Music, Song For Europe (1973)
Pink Floyd, In The Flesh (1979)
Nightcore, Where Are We Going (2013)
Thomas Hardy, During Wind And Rain (1917)
Mark Sheeky, Waiting For The Rain To End (2010)
Mark Sheeky/Gene Wilder/Marty Feldman, The Wrong Brain (2016)
Judy Garland, Somewhere Over The Rainbow (Distant) (1939)
Ennio Morricone, A Fistful Of Dollars (1967)
William Blake, Europe A Prophesy (extract) (1794)
Morton Stevens, Hawaii Five-O Theme (1968)
ELO, Poor Boy (The Greenwood) (1974)
Abba, The Day Before You Came to Hubert Parry/William Blake, Jerusalem (1916)
Jean Michel-Jarre, The Deserted Palace (1972)
William Blake, Voice Of The Ancient Bard (1789)
Delta Goodrem, I Can Sing A Rainbow (2004)
Eurythmics, 17 Again (1999)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Monday, June 27, 2016

Blame

People blame politicians for their misfortunes, or the past, or the stupid, or the rich, or their enemies, or politicians of the past, or witches, or immigrants, or technocrats, revolutionaries, bankers, religious zealots, be they alive, dead, or written about in holy books, which are also blamed, for the misfortunes of the world and of our lives. People also blame themselves.

People have an innate desire to blame someone or something else for misfortune. It's part of being self-aware to believe that the actions of selves matter. If actions of selves matter then praise and blame are logical, but if we are not self-aware then our actions are not ours, and we can't be responsible for them. To blame or praise things that are not self-aware makes no sense. We can't blame the Earth for quaking, even when it causes great destruction. We can blame a warmonger for an act with similar results.

Can an unconscious being, a dog (if dogs have no self-awareness) be blamed for an action that starts a war or kills someone? Dogs do kill and are blamed, but this is largely anthropomorphism by the justice system. We find it easy to blame a savage dog, treating the animal like a brutal person, yet don't treat chickens in a battery farm as more than automatons.

Can the stupid be blamed for acting stupidly? No, for their actions were always destined, given their knowledge and experience up that point. Similarly, the actions of the intelligent were always destined in the same way. Can they be blamed for the outcome of their actions either?

Once the illusion of self-control is released, feelings of blame are irrational. What has been has been, and was always to be, and to attach blame, or praise to the actions of others is a futile waste of mental energy, as futile as blaming the sun for rising and burning us, or the Earth for quaking.

This writing is also duplicated in the Writings section of www.marksheeky.com

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.37

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 37
Broadcast Wednesday 22 June 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Modest Mussorgsky, Night on a Bare Mountain (1867)
Judy Garland, Somewhere Over The Rainbow (1939)
Deborah Edgeley/Dave Hulatt, If Bach Had Been A Beekeeper by Charles Tomlinson (2016)
Unknown, Circus Circus (1985)
Alizee, Jen ai marre (2003)
ELO, Laredo Tornado (1974)
ELO, Wild West Hero (1977)
Abba, The Day Before You Came (1989) to Leonard Bernstein, The Magnificent Seven (1960)
Beatles, Here Comes The Sun (1969)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Art As Emotional Communication

People's answer to the question of "What is art?" varies, but for me art is emotional communication. Intellectual communication is not art, merely information. Du Champ's urinal was art originally because it was shocking, but it is not art now because it is no longer shocking, so what art is varies in time with the emotional flow of the observer, and of society.

This also means that art and its meaning is deeply tied to humanity and society, as all emotions step from social interactions, and also of it time, having different meanings and power at different times, and in different societies. The scribbled characters on a receipt may be simple commerce at one time, but in thousands of years, as the last mark of a dead civilisation, may gain new emotional significance and become an artwork. By the same token, a meaningful portrait of a saint or revolutionary leader may, in distant years, fade in feeling to become a mere factual image.

Errors and omissions frankly probable. This is one of several musings on life the universe and everything listed in the Writing and Essays section of www.marksheeky.com

Friday, June 17, 2016

Tiger Moving Nowhere At All

Here's a newly framed print of my Tiger Moving Nowhere At All painting. The size is unusual so each of these prints has a unique hand made frame with a different design. This one is number 3 of 50 and is for sale for £295, you can email me if you want to buy it and are able to collect it from Cheshire.

The painting is about the impending extinction of the tiger, an animal on the brink of oblivion. I wanted the shape of the picture itself to mimic the shape of a tiger's head.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.36

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 36
Broadcast Wednesday 15 June 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Ben Cassidy.

Peter Gabriel, Moribund the Burgermeister (1977)
Lost In Space, The Gandhi Warhol Conspiracy (2016)
Inkspeak: Deborah Edgeley/Dave Hulatt, Quick! Get Your Lows, While Stocks Last! (2016)
Eurythmics, Here Comes The Rain Again (1983)
Ben Cassidy, Angela (2016)
Ben Cassidy, I'm Your Man (2016)
ELO, Boy Blue (1974)
Ben Cassidy, Smashing (2016)
Abba, The Day Before You Came to The Terry and June Theme (1981)
Roxy Music, Virginia Plain (1972)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, June 08, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.35

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 35
Broadcast Wednesday 8 June 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Kate Bush, Stranded At The Moonbase (1975)
Electric Light Orchestra, Ticket To The Moon (1981)
Inkspeak: Deborah Edgeley/Dave Hulatt, Heathcliff (2016)
Kate Bush, Wuthering Heights (1978)
Nick Drake, Cello Song (1969)
Oldfield 1, Butoh 3 (2016)
Oldfield 1, Butoh 4 (2016)
Scott Walker Farmer In The City (1995)
Electric Light Orchestra, Can't Get It Out Of My Head (1974)
Scott Walker, The Plague (1967)
Cyndi Lauper, Time After Time (1983)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, June 01, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.34

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 34
Broadcast Wednesday 1 June 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guests Martin Rivers and Jaqi Kidd from Rivers & Kidd.

Beatles, Saw Her Standing There (1963)
Mark Sheeky And Live Mash, Dissection of the Eyeball (2016)
Martin Rivers/Different Skies, Climbing The Wall (2016)
Martin Rivers/Different Skies, River And The Sea (2016)
ELO, Eldorado Overture (1974)
Martin Rivers/Different Skies, Different Skies (2016)
Mark Sheeky And Live Mash, Embryo (2016)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Love And Death

We experience death as loss. We can't feel loss individually, only socially as a recognition of something missing. When we die, we will feel nothing ourselves. So feeling loss is an integral part of our life, it can't exist without it and decay itself is a fundamental part of existence.

Love is attachment and death is disattachment, which is only noticed relative to the prior attachment, so experience is a constant flow of change from states of attachment and states of disattachment, and it is these changes of state that define existence. This can even occur at atomic levels, the bubbles of the universe, a flow of attachment and disattachment.

To be totally disattached, to be invisible and unconsidered by anyone, is the same as being dead, and to re-attach is to spontaneously live, but only in the minds of others, as our death can only be measured by others. Thus, our relationships and how others think of us defines our existence.

As existence is defined by the flow of attachment and disattachment, then change and disruption is at its heart. To fit in, to rest, to stand still, these things are decadent, and passion, disruption, energetic change, creativity, define the brightness of life.

One of several musings. This post is also listed in Writings/Essays on www.marksheeky.com

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.33: Journey To The Centre Of The Earth Special

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 33: Journey To The Centre Of The Earth Special
Broadcast Wednesday 18 May 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Preface to the Journey (2014)
The Journey Overture (2014)
Journey's Dawn (2014)
Crystals (2014)
The Gothic Cathedral (2014)
A Quest for Water (2014)
The Hansbach (2014)
Fervent Prayer (2014)
The Recollection (2014)
Lost & Found (2014)
Echoes (2014)
4 Miles (2014)
The Reunion (2014)
A New Vista (2014)
A World Within a World (2014)
The Raft (2014)
The Battle (2014)
Cumulus Clouds (2014)
The Storm (2014)
The Cemetery (2014)
Quaternary Man (2014)
Mastodons (2014)
The Forest (2014)
Ages Of Man (2014)
The Tunnel (2014)
Hall of the Mountain King (2014)
Mount Etna (2014)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.32

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 32
Broadcast Wednesday 18 May 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Sarah Bird.

Lisa Lougheed, Run With Us (1988)
John Williams, Dual Of The Fates (1999)
Sparks, How Do I Get To Carnegie Hall (2002)
Howard Goodall, Red Dwarf Theme (1988)
Mark Sheeky, Acorn To Oak (2010)
Eurythmics/The King & Queen of America (1989)
Queen, Princes of the Universe (1986)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.31

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 31
Broadcast Wednesday 11 May 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Simon Woolham.

Eurythmics, Thorn In My Side (1986)
Freddie Mercury & Montserrat Caballé, Barcelona (1988)
Christopher Casson, Oh Dear What Can The Matter Be (1967)
They Call It Stormy Monday, T-Bone Walker (1948)
M4SK 22, A Sea Song (2014)
Simon Woolham, Dark End (2010)
M4SK22, The Shore (2011)
Abba, The Winner Takes It All (1980)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.30: Star Wars Day Special

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 30: Star Wars Day Special
Broadcast Wednesday 4 May 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guests Chris Godber and Matt Nin from BBAcidD2.

Meco, Star Wars Disco (2008)
BBACIDD2, I've Been Waiting For You (2016)
Rick Wakeman, Ages Of Man (2015)
Rick Wakeman, The Tunnel (2015)
Rick Wakeman, Hall of the Mountain King (2015)
Rick Wakeman, Mount Etna (2015)
John Williams, Imperial March (to the lyrics of God Save The Queen) (1979)
BBACIDD2, It's A Machine (2016)
BBACIDD2, Nostromo (2016)
System F, Out Of The Blue (1999)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Gone

I still love you completely.
I still miss you each day.
My heart is still broken and fallen away.

I still see your face
in my dreams as I strive
to forget every memory,
and crush every hope.

In my soul you're alive,
in my life you live on,
while I'm dead inside,
as I cope,
with you gone.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.29

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 29
Broadcast Wednesday 20 April 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Deborah Edgeley.

Sparks, Good Morning (2008)
Nightwish, Endless Forms Most Beautiful (2015)
Christopher Casson, My Mother Said (1967)
Scott Walker, Light (1999), (with The Shaggs, My Little Sports Car)
Rick Wakeman, Mastodons (2015)
Rick Wakeman, The Forest (2015)
Scott Walker, The Darkest Forest (1999)
Orbital, The Box (1996)
Ken Dodd, Happiness (1964)
The Animals, We Gotta Get Out Of This Place (1965)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.28

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 28
Broadcast Wednesday 13 April 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guests Heather Lannin.

Mark Sheeky, Jellyfish (2013)
Scott Walker, Jackie (1967)
Scott Walker, Angelica (1968)
Modest Mussorgsky, The Hut on Fowl's Legs (1874)
Rick Wakeman, 20 The Cemetery (2015)
Rick Wakeman, 21 Quaternary Man (2015)
Scott Walker, Track Five (1981)
Jai Ho, The Pussycat Dolls (2008)
Moke, Stand My Ground (2016)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Structural Forms In Visual Art

For some time I've made paintings that reflect a common theme throughout the work, an image or shape in the painting like a visual motif that appears in different forms throughout it. I called these symphonic paintings, but in the past year or two I've been focusing more consciously on the idea of visual art that uses musical symphonic forms (such as the sonata-rondo form used in classical music). I compose music too, and much of my work in other media (eg. writing, and computer programming) is emotionally and structurally related on a deeper level. The concept of an defined structure in visual art seems to be lacking.

I think this is an essential progression. Most artworks use structured forms, from small scale works like poems, to music symphonies or films. Some classical paintings have degrees of form, such as using the golden section, or a triptych arrangement (these were initially altar pieces, and so partly defined by function, but some modern artists like Francis Bacon developed this form in a secular way) but these are for the most part exceptions, and structural forms are largely absent from visual art.

Structure exists in artforms because it aids communication between artist and viewer. In writing, we use punctuation, sentences, paragraphs, and chapters for this reason. This is structure. Classical music is an essentially abstract form, and the structure helps unify what could be random or nonsensical arrangement of notes into something meaningful, creating comprehensible narrative.

Much of visual art lacks these structures, or relies on third party curation to develop them. A painting exhibition might be arranged so that it is viewed in one particular order, with a theme or grouping. This is structure, but it can be imposed by a curator at whim. For many exhibitions the artist arranges the work, but this can be seen as a separate process. The arrangement isn't always seen as the artwork itself, when this is vital; and of course the paintings on display should reflect the structure and the structure reflect the painting content.

The rules of form

1. An art installation should be structured and feature several movements, to be experienced in order, that grant it a temporal quality. Life exists in time, and visual art needs a temporal quality to represent feelings accurately. Reliance on chance or psychology or opinion for order is not sufficient. This is necessary because a complex narrative requires a complex mix of emotions and ideas, and the artist must be able to guide the viewer in the intended way to communicate accurately.

2. A structure must be unified with a theme. A theme forms common thread that pulls each separate part towards the whole, to create one singular work. An artwork on this scale is not an arbitrary segment on the line of infinite time, but a unified entity with start, middle and end, all of which together form one concept. A theme is needed to hold together the disparate parts of the structure. Variety occurs as variation of a single fundamental idea.

These are the essential rules and can apply to any art from, from poetry and music to visual art, but temporality is usually lacking in visual art. Feelings of structure, order, grace, and beauty are essential components of any artform too, but sometimes for emotional effect these can be broken. Breaking the temporal or global thematic aspects however will only ever destroy an idea and hamper communication between artist and viewer and always dilute an idea, reduce its contrast and intensity.

Errors and omissions frankly probable. This is one of several musings on life the universe and everything listed in the Writing and Essays section of www.marksheeky.com

Thursday, April 07, 2016

Dream

Really positive dream last night.

I was wondering around a busy supermarket with prime minister David Cameron, we'd both been given new Nokia mobile phones, but really cheap and rubbish, made from white velcro, with soft, brightly coloured buttons. We decided to ask for replacements and were sent to a distant part of the shop, high up, remote and dark with angular passageways, draped in shadows like the back of a theatre or the inside of a mechanism. The floor sloped down like a funnel, and a hole at the bottom led to a passageway, like the tunnel in Running Man that was the entrance to place we needed to go to. I was now blind, but only blind people could go there, so had to go alone.

I went through the tunnel and emerged from a lake in a dark land and a crowd of dark people. My phone was now a magical white stone, casting bright light in all directions and the people were in awe of it, but warned me that light was banned here. A guard on horseback appeared and I was arrested and tied up, then presented before the king in a courtyard. The king was dressed a bit like a Klingon warrior, with orange/brown colours. I was to be executed by him and his batleth, but then I produced a glowing white sword from a scabbard on my back. The blade was slightly jagged and so bright. I sliced the king in two, freeing the land from darkness.

For me this is about the power of communication, but it was interesting to note the crowds of dark people, the oppressed, who wanted to be freed by the light. The dream was very visual and chromanant, elements, I could paint.

Wednesday, April 06, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.27

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 27
Broadcast Wednesday 6 April 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guests Barbara Barlow, and Beckie Morley.

The Beatles, Fool On The Hill (1967)
Jean-Michel Jarre, Deserted Palace (1970)
Renaissance, Cold Is Being (1974)
Kate Bush, All The Love (1982)
Rick Wakeman, Cumulus Clouds (2015)
Rick Wakeman, The Storm (2015)
Pink Floyd, Airplane (Goodbye Blue Sky) (1979)
Europe, The Final Countdown (1986)
Nomizu Iori, Kore Wa Zombie Desu Ka (Is This A Zombie) (2012)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

ArtsLab S1 Ep.26

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Series 1 Episode 26
Broadcast Wednesday 30 March 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special Guest Jo Thilwind.

Peter Wolf, Come As You Are (1987)
Mark Sheeky, The Night Watcher from The Anatomy of Emotions (2016)
Queen, Nevermore (1974)
Boney M, Rasputin (Semi-Backwards) (1978)
Gong, Love Is How You Make It (2013)
Gong, The Pot Head Pixies (1973)
Gong, White Doves (1992)
Rick Wakeman, The Raft (2015)
Rick Wakeman, The Battle (2015)
Mark Sheeky & Tor James Faulkner, Nineteen Eighty Five (2009)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk