Wednesday, July 27, 2016

ArtsLab 42

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Show 42
Broadcast Wednesday 27 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Jackie Lee, The Rupert Bear Theme (1970)
Prokofiev, Romeo and Juliet Suite: Madrigal (1935)
Somebody to Love, Jefferson Airplane (1967)
William Shakespeare, Sigh no more (1598)
The Passions, In Love With A German Film Star (1981)
Deborah Edgeley, Dry Grass Sings (2016)
Alphaville, Summer in Berlin (1984)
ELO, Illusions In G Major (1974)
Leona Anderson, Rats In My Room (1958)
Tim Watson, The Stars (2016)
Mark Sheeky, Starscape (2016)
Origa, Shooting Star (2013)
Abba, The Day Before You Came (1981) to Rentaro Taki, Moon Over The Ruined Castle (1901)
Mark Sheeky, The Hague 1882 (2006)
Don McLean, Vincent (1971)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Sunday, July 24, 2016

MIDI Variable Length Value Code

I added a Type 1 MIDI export function to my sequencer software today, so I thought I'd post the MIDI delta time code I used as I couldn't find any other code snippets online.

lword tempstore[4], tempstorecounter, i, deltatime, trackbuffersize;
char trackbuffer[];
.
.
.
// This will convert a long word time variable in deltatime into variable bit rate MIDI delta time
// format, storing it as a string of chars in "trackbuffer"
// tempstore is used to invert the significance of the bits, as the MBS's need to come first

for (tempstorecounter=0; deltatime>127; deltatime=(deltatime>>7))
tempstore[tempstorecounter++]=(char)(deltatime&0x7f);
tempstore[tempstorecounter++]=deltatime;
for (i=0; i<tempstorecounter; i++)
{
if (i<tempstorecounter-1)
trackbuffer[trackbuffersize++]=(char)(0x80|tempstore[tempstorecounter-1-i]);
else
trackbuffer[trackbuffersize++]=(char)tempstore[tempstorecounter-1-i];
}

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

ArtsLab 41

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Show 41
Broadcast Wednesday 20 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special Report From Philippa Wynne.
Live Phone-In With Alex Staniforth.

Jeff Wayne, Eve Of The War (1978) into The Flumps (1977)
Mary Black, The Fog in Monterey (1989)
Jim Clarkson, The Whale (2016)
John Taverner, The Whale (1968)
ELO, Nobody's Child (1974)
The Shaggs, That Little Sports Car (1969)
Delta Goodrem, I Can Sing A Rainbow (2004)
Yann Tiersen, Porz Goret (2015)
The Day Before You Came (1981) to Herb Alpert, Spanish Flea (1965)
Mark Sheeky, Space Love (2008)
Audial Arts, Fate No. 7 (1991)
Paul Sheeky, PTHazard Still Life In Blue (2008)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

ArtsLab 40

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Show 40
Broadcast Wednesday 13 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Alfred Piccaver, There'll Always Be An England (1940)
Art Garfunkel, Bright Eyes (1979)
Queen, Ogre Battle (1974)
Gabrielle Aplin, The Power Of Love (2013)
The Piggleswick Folk, Teddy Bears Picnic (1967)
Alizee, Jen Ai Marre (2006)
ELO, Mister Kingdom (1974)
Abba, The Day Before You Came to Brad Fiedel, The Terminator (1984)
Deborah Edgeley/Dave Hulatt, If Bach Had Been A Beekeeper by Charles Tomlinson (2016)
Bach, Cello Suite No.1 Prelude (1717)
Peter Gabriel, Blood of Eden (1992)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

A Free Will Of Infinite Possibility

Free will is our ability to imagine any possible future, even though we are destined to enact only the one that was always fated. It is the barrier between these states that causes all of our agonies.

The mind-body gap, the gap between the real world and our thoughts, is the gap between the certainty of the universe and fate and the uncertainty, the infinite possibility of the imagination. If time is a dimension then the future is necessarily as firm as the past, and destiny is certain, but we can think anything that we do not enact. It is this very freedom, akin to a quantum state of flux that gives us the illusion of freewill.

The very moment when our thoughts are read by our perception then, those thoughts snap into reality, but before this our thoughts are free to conceptualise anything. This is pure freedom versus containment on one level. Perhaps at that point, the ball is already rolling and fate will create a pattern of thought and argument that will end with an inevitable action on the world, but crucially, there is a point where infinite possibility exists, or at least a fluid potential that is not a definite and certain action. This is freedom, and the barrier between this free state and a future certain state marks the boundary between free-will and fate.

In emotional terms, I suspect that wrestling with this barrier, which much surely be an organic, evolving and fluid, psychological membrane, is the root of human distress.

This writing is also duplicated in the Writings section of www.marksheeky.com

ArtsLab 39

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Show 39
Broadcast Wednesday 6 July 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.
Special guest Sylvia Hikins.

Paul Muriat, Love Is Blue (1967)
Arvo Part, Cantus In Memoriam Benjamin Britten (1977)
Christopher Casson, Oh Dear What Can The Matter Be (1969)
Bjork, Aurora (2001)
ELO, Mister Kingdom (1974)
Abba, The Day Before You Came to Mozart, Lacrimosa (1791)
Snowbird, Anne Murray (1969)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

ArtsLab 38

ArtsLab with Mark Sheeky
Show 38
Broadcast Wednesday 29 June 2016, 4pm to 5pm GMT.

Roxy Music, Song For Europe (1973)
Pink Floyd, In The Flesh (1979)
Nightcore, Where Are We Going (2013)
Thomas Hardy, During Wind And Rain (1917)
Mark Sheeky, Waiting For The Rain To End (2010)
Mark Sheeky/Gene Wilder/Marty Feldman, The Wrong Brain (2016)
Judy Garland, Somewhere Over The Rainbow (Distant) (1939)
Ennio Morricone, A Fistful Of Dollars (1967)
William Blake, Europe A Prophesy (extract) (1794)
Morton Stevens, Hawaii Five-O Theme (1968)
ELO, Poor Boy (The Greenwood) (1974)
Abba, The Day Before You Came to Hubert Parry/William Blake, Jerusalem (1916)
Jean Michel-Jarre, The Deserted Palace (1972)
William Blake, Voice Of The Ancient Bard (1789)
Delta Goodrem, I Can Sing A Rainbow (2004)
Eurythmics, 17 Again (1999)

All past ArtsLab programmes can be listened to here:
https://www.mixcloud.com/RedShiftRadio/playlists/artslab/

You can listen live during the broadcast on:
www.redshiftradio.co.uk

Monday, June 27, 2016

Blame

People blame politicians for their misfortunes, or the past, or the stupid, or the rich, or their enemies, or politicians of the past, or witches, or immigrants, or technocrats, revolutionaries, bankers, religious zealots, be they alive, dead, or written about in holy books, which are also blamed, for the misfortunes of the world and of our lives. People also blame themselves.

People have an innate desire to blame someone or something else for misfortune. It's part of being self-aware to believe that the actions of selves matter. If actions of selves matter then praise and blame are logical, but if we are not self-aware then our actions are not ours, and we can't be responsible for them. To blame or praise things that are not self-aware makes no sense. We can't blame the Earth for quaking, even when it causes great destruction. We can blame a warmonger for an act with similar results.

Can an unconscious being, a dog (if dogs have no self-awareness) be blamed for an action that starts a war or kills someone? Dogs do kill and are blamed, but this is largely anthropomorphism by the justice system. We find it easy to blame a savage dog, treating the animal like a brutal person, yet don't treat chickens in a battery farm as more than automatons.

Can the stupid be blamed for acting stupidly? No, for their actions were always destined, given their knowledge and experience up that point. Similarly, the actions of the intelligent were always destined in the same way. Can they be blamed for the outcome of their actions either?

Once the illusion of self-control is released, feelings of blame are irrational. What has been has been, and was always to be, and to attach blame, or praise to the actions of others is a futile waste of mental energy, as futile as blaming the sun for rising and burning us, or the Earth for quaking.

This writing is also duplicated in the Writings section of www.marksheeky.com